Bad statistics of online dating

When we first studied online dating habits in 2005, most Americans had little exposure to online dating or to the people who used it, and they tended to view it as a subpar way of meeting people.Today, nearly half of the public knows someone who uses online dating or who has met a spouse or partner via online dating – and attitudes toward online dating have grown progressively more positive.The share of 18- to 24-year-olds who use online dating has roughly tripled from 10% in 2013 to 27% today.Online dating use among 55- to 64-year-olds has also risen substantially since the last Pew Research Center survey on the topic.To be sure, many people remain puzzled that someone would want to find a romantic partner online – 23% of Americans agree with the statement that “people who use online dating sites are desperate” – but in general it is much more culturally acceptable than it was a decade ago.Online dating has jumped among adults under age 25 as well as those in their late 50s and early 60s.Unlike singles in the '70s, who cruised bars and discos and risked looking for love in all the wrong places, tens of millions of singles each day join and log on to online dating sites with the belief that their efforts to find love and companionship are safe and secure.

That's a small fraction of the number of online encounters, to be sure.

They exploit their access to potential victims and establish trust before meeting.

Attacks mostly were committed during the first face-to-face meetings after contact was made through dating sites or apps. Online dating services have been around since the early days of the Web, with major paid sites like emerging in 1995 and e Harmony in 2000.

With this growing industry comes a lot of information that’s worth knowing.

We’ve compiled a list of 21 good, bad, and just plain weird statistics on online dating that will blow your mind.

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